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Diet & Health : Heart & Blood Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


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Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Proteins from garden pea may help fight high blood pressure, kidney disease
Researchers in Canada are reporting that proteins found in a common garden pea show promise as a natural food additive or new dietary supplement for fighting high blood pressure and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Those potentially life-threatening conditions affect millions of people worldwide.
Mar 23, 2009 - 9:16:35 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Low vitamin D levels associated with several risk factors in teenagers
• Low levels of vitamin D were associated with increased risk of high blood pressure, high blood sugar and metabolic syndrome in teenagers.
• The highest levels of vitamin D were found in whites, the lowest levels in blacks and intermediate levels in Mexican-Americans.

Mar 16, 2009 - 9:59:47 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Consuming a little less salt could mean fewer deaths
• A moderate decrease in daily salt intake could benefit the U.S. population and reduce the rates of heart disease and deaths.
• All segments of the U.S. population would be expected to benefit, with the largest health benefits experienced by African Americans who are more likely to have hypertension and whose blood pressure may be more sensitive to salt.

Mar 16, 2009 - 9:58:22 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Green, black tea can reduce stroke risk
Drinking at least three cups of green or black tea a day can significantly reduce the risk of stroke, a new UCLA study has found. And the more you drink, the better your odds of staving off a stroke.
Feb 23, 2009 - 10:01:34 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Fast food linked to stroke risk
A new study suggests that eating too much fast food may increase risk of stroke, the third largest killer in the United States, Reuters reported.
Feb 21, 2009 - 2:07:33 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
High-Fat Diets Inflame Fat Tissue Around Blood Vessels, Contribute to Heart Disease
A study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati shows that high-fat diets, even if consumed for a short amount of time, can inflame fat tissue surrounding blood vessels, possibly contributing to cardiovascular disease.
Feb 18, 2009 - 11:30:09 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Fructose-sweetened drinks increase nonfasting triglycerides in obese adults
Obese people who drink fructose-sweetened beverages with their meals have an increased rise of triglycerides following the meal, according to new research from the Monell Center.
Feb 17, 2009 - 4:04:51 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Potato chips may raise heart risk
A new study published in the March 2009 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition by Marek Naruszewicz and colleagues from Poland suggests that acrylamide from foods may increase the risk of heart disease.
Feb 13, 2009 - 11:22:13 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Fructose-sweetened drinks increase nonfasting triglycerides in obese adults
Obese people who drink fructose-sweetened beverages with their meals have an increased rise of triglycerides following the meal, according to new research from the Monell Center.
Feb 12, 2009 - 2:55:07 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Cutting salt isn't the only way to reduce blood pressure
A new study suggests that people trying to lower their blood pressure should also boost their intake of potassium, which has the opposite effect to sodium.
Jan 26, 2009 - 2:03:15 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Statins may treat blood vessel disorder that can lead to fatal strokes
In a finding that could save thousands of lives a year, University of Utah School of Medicine researchers have shown that a blood vessel disorder leading to unpredictable, sometimes fatal, hemorrhagic strokes, seizures, paralysis or other problems is treatable with the same statin drugs that millions of people take to control high cholesterol.
Jan 26, 2009 - 10:26:24 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Salt reduction may offer cardioprotective effects beyond blood pressure reduction
A study published in the February 2009 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that salt reduction may offer cardioprotective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The study was led by Kacie Dickinson of Flinders University, South Australia.
Jan 16, 2009 - 11:38:41 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Vitamin C helps maintain normal blood pressure
A new study by researchers at the University of California Berkeley suggests that high intake of vitamin C may help prevent high blood pressure in young women.
Jan 14, 2009 - 12:42:15 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Study Shows Consuming Hibiscus Tea Lowers Blood Pressure
Drinking hibiscus tea lowered blood pressure in a group of pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, according to a report being presented today by nutrition scientist Diane McKay at the American Heart Association's annual conference in New Orleans, La. Hypertension is a condition in which blood pressure is chronically high, and it affects one-third of all U.S. adults.
Jan 8, 2009 - 9:22:47 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Overweight, physical inactivity boosts heart failure risk
Simply having some extra pounds and being physically inactive a bit may dramatically boost your risk of heart failure, a new study in the Dec 23 2008 issue of Circulation suggests.
Dec 23, 2008 - 9:24:49 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
High intake of phosphorus may raise cardiovascular risk
In patients with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), higher levels of phosphorus in the blood may increase calcification of the major arteries and heart valves and raise the risk of cardiovascular disease, a study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) suggests.
Dec 11, 2008 - 7:50:30 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Certain dairy foods linked to higher risk of stroke
Consuming certain types of dairy foods may increase the risk of stroke, a new epidemiologic study in the Dec 2008 issue of Epidemiology suggests.
Dec 9, 2008 - 7:15:44 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Fat, protein and meat pose no risk for renal cell cancer
Consumption of fat, protein and meat poses no risk for renal cell cancer, a new study published in the Dec 3 2008 issue of Journal of National Cancer Institute suggests.
Dec 8, 2008 - 8:30:41 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
A little wine boosts omega-3 in the body
We have known it for a long time that drinking wine may protect against cardiovascular disease. We just don't know why. A new study suggests that the possible protective effect of wine may be rendered by influencing metabolism of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been known for its protection against coronary heart disease.
Dec 5, 2008 - 7:51:05 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Vitamin D deficiency linked to elevated heart risk
Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and patients with heart risk should get screened and treated for the condition, a review article published in the December, 9, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) suggests.
Dec 2, 2008 - 10:47:06 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Green tea lowers blood pressure and cholesterol: study
A new study published in 2008 in Nutrition suggests that daily intake of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts may lower blood pressure, cholesterol and biomarkers of oxidative stress.
Dec 1, 2008 - 8:50:45 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
People with vitamin D deficiency more likely to get hurt by statins
Statins cause muscle aches and pains in a whopping 38.8 percent of patients, according to nutritionist Byron Richards.
Nov 28, 2008 - 5:10:13 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Vitamin C lowers CRP just as well as statins
One study we have recently reported found that statins lowered plasma C-reactive protein or CRP in people with relatively high CRP, but normal cholesterol levels.
Nov 28, 2008 - 4:35:39 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Got high blood pressure? Eat garlic
A new study suggests that eating garlic may help lower blood pressure in patients with an elevated systolic blood pressure, but not in those without elevated SBP.
Nov 25, 2008 - 1:57:31 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Women with diabetes more likely to die from heart attack than men
A new study published in the Dec 2008 issue of Heart suggests that under age 65, women with diabetics are more likely to die from heart attack than men in the same age group.
Nov 18, 2008 - 10:55:47 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Plant sterols fight cholesterol as well as statins
Many people know more about statins than plant sterols when it comes to their cholesterol lowering effects.   The fact is that plant sterols are quite effective at lowering cholesterol which is believed by many to be a risk factor for cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes.
Nov 12, 2008 - 10:07:11 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Statins lower cholesterol, so do omega-3 and red yeast rice
People even with normal range of cholesterol may benefit from taking Crestor, a statin made by Astra-Zeneca, according to a study presented in New Orleans at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions.
Nov 10, 2008 - 12:32:27 PM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
More Americans hospitalized for heart failure now than ever
The rate of hospitalization for heart failure has increased drastically among seniors in the last three decades in the United States, according to a study presented at the American heart Association conference in New Orleans.
Nov 10, 2008 - 10:20:07 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Fasting reduces heart risk
Regularly fasting or skipping meals may reduce risk of heart disease, according to a study presented at a 2007 American Heart Association conference.
Nov 10, 2008 - 10:03:03 AM

Diet & Health : Heart & Blood
Low fat diet cuts cardiovascular risk
Survivors from first heart attack might want to consider using a low fat or Mediterranean diet and both drastically reduce future cardiovascular events, according to a new study.
Nov 9, 2008 - 10:14:15 AM

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