Foodconsumer.org

 
USCards.com Bookmark Us
All Food, Diet and Health News 
 
 Misc. News
 Must-Read News
 Letter to Editor
 Featured Products
 Recalls & Alerts
 Consumer Affair
 Non-food Things
 Health Tips
 Interesting Sites
 
 Diet & Health
 Heart & Blood
 Cancer
 Body Weight
 Children & Women
 General Health
 Nutrition
 
 Food & Health
 Food Chemicals
 Biological Agents
 Cooking & Packing
 Technologies
 Agri. & Environ.
 Laws & Politics
 
 General Health
 Drug News
 Diseases
 Mental Health
 Infectious Disease
 Environment
 Lifestyle
 Government
 Other News
 
 Food Consumer
 FC News & Others
Search





Search Foodconsumer & Others


Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo
Newsfeed

foodconsumer.org news feed
Su bmit news[release]



More than 100 credit cards available at uscards.com from uscards.com, you can pick more than 100 credit cards


Food & Health : Food Chemicals Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


Database of Isoflavone Compounds in Foods Updated
By Rosalie Marion Bliss
Jan 8, 2009 - 9:20:19 AM

E.mail t.his a.rticle
 P.rinter f.riendly p.age
Get n.ewsletter
 
   
September 23, 2008 - A newly updated food composition database of plant chemical compounds called isoflavones was launched today by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

A subclass of flavonoids, isoflavones have mild estrogen-like properties and other biological attributes that, when present in foods, may reduce the risk of some chronic diseases. Isoflavones are found primarily in soybeans and soybean products. Small amounts are present in a wide variety of other food items.

The new database provides analytical values for three individual isoflavone compounds--genistein, daidzein and glycitein--in nearly 550 foods. These are grouped under 21 separate categories, such as "Legume Products," "Baked Products" and "Baby Foods."

The updated database was compiled by David Haytowitz and Seema Bhagwat, scientists working at the Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), which is part of the ARS Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Md.

In assembling the database, the researchers conducted an extensive review of various data sources and evaluated scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals since 1999. All the data were evaluated by a data quality evaluation system developed by the NDL scientists.

The Isoflavone Database is one of several "Special Interest Databases" produced by NDL to provide data on bioactive compounds for selected foods. Others include the Flavonoid, Proanthocyanidin and ORAC databases.

The Special Interest Databases complement the NDL's core product--the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR21)--which is the major authoritative source of food composition information in the United States.

The new Isoflavone Database can be accessed online at:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata/isoflav

ARS is a scientific research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.





© 2004-2008 by foodconsumer.org unless otherwise specified

Top of Page




Google
 
Web foodconsumer.org

Search Consumer-friendly Health Sites












We have moved to Food Consumer . Org



disclaimer | advertising | jobs | privacy | about us | newsletter | Submit news/articles
link partners: | Buy Viagra | MarketAmerica.com |
Buy a home | Auto Insurance | Mortgage refinancing | DaytonaCPA.com | Take Your Blog to a Higher Level
© Copyright 2004 - 2008 foodconsumer.org All rights reserved

Disclaimer: What's published on this website should be considered opinions of respective writers only and foodconsumer.org which has no political agenda nor commercial ambition may or may not endorse any opinion of any writer. No accuracy is guaranteed although writers are doing their best to provide accurate information only. The information on this website should not be construed as medical advice and should not be used to replace professional services provided by qualified or licensed health care workers. The site serves only as a platform for writers and readers to share knowledge, experience, and information from the scientific community, organizations, government agencies and individuals. Foodconsumer.org encourages readers who have had medical conditions to consult with licensed health care providers - conventional and or alternative medical practitioners.