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Misc. News : Featured Products Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


All About Michigan Maple Syrup
By Ken Asselin
Dec 11, 2006 - 2:59:21 PM

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The history of Michigan Maple Syrup is nearly as old as the land itself. Maple syrup is a true American food, and the art of making maple syrup is generally attributed to Native Americans. The native population of North America was producing maple products when Europeans first arrived.

Producing maple syrup is essentially a matter of concentrating the sugar solution to a predetermined level through evaporation. The equipment needed depends on whether you are producing maple syrup for home or commercial use. If you have maple trees in your forest, then you may want to consider producing maple syrup from them. Although equipment has been modernized, the basic process of producing maple syrup remains the same. As more and more people began producing maple syrup, the technology of doing so improved gradually. It is a general rule-of-thumb that each tap will yield 10 gallons of sap throughout an approximate six week season, producing 1 quart of maple syrup. A large proportion of the costs of producing maple syrup are in fixed overhead, but producing real maple syrup is worth the effort and the risk; its sweet, rich flavor has never been successfully imitated.

Pure maple syrup is graded according to Federal USDA regulations, and is based on both color and flavor. Grading standards are the same for most of the United States. Real maple syrup is a pure, natural product with a unique flavor, and is simply the concentrated sap of the maple tree. Making maple syrup is a time-honored tradition in many parts of Michigan, and it is as much of an art as a science. Maple syrup is approximately 33 percent water and 67 percent sugar, and is a 100 % natural and organic product. Maple syrup is only produced in North America, since Europe does not have the proper weather conditions conducive to producing meaningful amounts of sap. Maple syrup is sublime when poured over buttermilk pancakes or waffles, and is considered by many to be the ultimate natural product.

We find most people are unaware of the many different uses of maple syrup, other than the tried and true 'pancakes and syrup'. Try pure Michigan Maple Syrup on ....grapefruit, hot cereal, granola, plain yogurt, winter squash, or sweet potatoes. Use it as a glaze on meat, or poultry and over ice cream for an outstanding dessert. For a special treat put it in coffee, milk or a milkshake. The uses for maple syrup are never-ending.

Maple syrup is one agricultural crop in which there is no surplus. Maple syrup is only produced in North America, since Europe does not have the proper weather conditions conducive to producing meaningful amounts of sap. All maple syrup is not created equal, and maple syrup is a source of pride for the state of Michigan. Maple syrup is boiled even further to produce Maple cream, sugar and candy and is a natural sweetener with many health benefits. Fresh maple syrup is truly one of the first signs of spring.

Michigan Maple Syrup

About The Author

Ken Asselin is webmaster for the Buds Best Buys series of shopping websites. You can visit his website at: http://www.michigan-maple-syrup.com .




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