Foodconsumer.org

 
USCards.com Bookmark Us
All Food, Diet and Health News 
 
 Misc. News
 Must-Read News
 Letter to Editor
 Featured Products
 Recalls & Alerts
 Consumer Affair
 Non-food Things
 Health Tips
 Interesting Sites
 
 Diet & Health
 Heart & Blood
 Cancer
 Body Weight
 Children & Women
 General Health
 Nutrition
 
 Food & Health
 Food Chemicals
 Biological Agents
 Cooking & Packing
 Technologies
 Agri. & Environ.
 Laws & Politics
 
 General Health
 Drug News
 Diseases
 Mental Health
 Infectious Disease
 Environment
 Lifestyle
 Government
 Other News
 
 Food Consumer
 FC News & Others
Search





Search Foodconsumer & Others


Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo
Newsfeed

foodconsumer.org news feed
Su bmit news[release]



More than 100 credit cards available at uscards.com from uscards.com, you can pick more than 100 credit cards


General Health : Drug News Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


Hormone Therapy Linked to Brain Shrinkage, But Not Lesions
By news release
Jan 12, 2009 - 4:55:35 PM

E.mail t.his a.rticle
 P.rinter f.riendly p.age
Get n.ewsletter
 
   

Two new studies show that hormone therapy for women is linked to brain shrinkage, but not to the small brain lesions that are the first sign of cerebrovascular disease. The studies are published in the January 13, 2009, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Earlier studies showed that estrogen with or without added progestin increased the risk for developing dementia and cognitive decline, or difficulty with thinking skills and memory in women age 65 and older.

These new studies aimed to look at how the hormones might affect memory and thinking skills. The studies involved participants of the Women’s Health Initiative hormone therapy clinical trials who also agreed to participate in a substudy called the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study. These studies were stopped earlier than planned when researchers found that the hormone therapy increased health risks and failed to prevent heart disease.

Researchers took MRI brain scans of 1,400 women ages 71 to 89 one to four years after the Women’s Health Initiative hormone studies ended. They found women who had taken estrogen with or without progestin had smaller brain volumes in two areas of the brain than the women who had taken a placebo. Brain volume was 2.37 cubic centimeters lower in the frontal lobe in the women taking estrogen and .10 cubic centimeters lower in the hippocampus. Both areas are involved in thinking and memory skills, and loss of volume in the hippocampus is a risk factor for dementia.

“These effects were most apparent in women who may already have had some memory problems before they started taking hormones,” said study author Susan Resnick, PhD, of the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore, MD. “This suggests that estrogen may adversely affect thinking skills among women whose brains may already be beginning a neurodegenerative disease process.”

In the second study, researchers found that hormone therapy was not linked to an increase in volumes of small vascular lesions in the brain or “silent strokes” that are often the first sign of cerebrovascular disease. “This was not what we expected to find,” said study author Laura H. Coker, PhD, of Wake Forest University Health Sciences in Winston-Salem, NC. Coker said the negative effects of hormone therapy on cognitive skills may not be related primarily to vascular disease but to neurodegeneration, which is supported by the first study’s findings of brain atrophy.

The Women’s Health Initiative, a major 15-year research program designed to address the most frequent causes of death, disability and poor quality of life in postmenopausal women, is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The memory study was also funded in part by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 21,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, restless legs syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, narcolepsy, and stroke.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit www.aan.com.





© 2004-2008 by foodconsumer.org unless otherwise specified

Top of Page




Google
 
Web foodconsumer.org

Search Consumer-friendly Health Sites












We have moved to Food Consumer . Org



disclaimer | advertising | jobs | privacy | about us | newsletter | Submit news/articles
link partners: | Buy Viagra | MarketAmerica.com |
Buy a home | Auto Insurance | Mortgage refinancing | DaytonaCPA.com | Take Your Blog to a Higher Level
© Copyright 2004 - 2008 foodconsumer.org All rights reserved

Disclaimer: What's published on this website should be considered opinions of respective writers only and foodconsumer.org which has no political agenda nor commercial ambition may or may not endorse any opinion of any writer. No accuracy is guaranteed although writers are doing their best to provide accurate information only. The information on this website should not be construed as medical advice and should not be used to replace professional services provided by qualified or licensed health care workers. The site serves only as a platform for writers and readers to share knowledge, experience, and information from the scientific community, organizations, government agencies and individuals. Foodconsumer.org encourages readers who have had medical conditions to consult with licensed health care providers - conventional and or alternative medical practitioners.