Foodconsumer.org

 
USCards.com Bookmark Us
All Food, Diet and Health News 
 
 Misc. News
 Must-Read News
 Letter to Editor
 Featured Products
 Recalls & Alerts
 Consumer Affair
 Non-food Things
 Health Tips
 Interesting Sites
 
 Diet & Health
 Heart & Blood
 Cancer
 Body Weight
 Children & Women
 General Health
 Nutrition
 
 Food & Health
 Food Chemicals
 Biological Agents
 Cooking & Packing
 Technologies
 Agri. & Environ.
 Laws & Politics
 
 General Health
 Drug News
 Diseases
 Mental Health
 Infectious Disease
 Environment
 Lifestyle
 Government
 Other News
 
 Food Consumer
 FC News & Others
Search





Search Foodconsumer & Others


Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo
Newsfeed

foodconsumer.org news feed
Su bmit news[release]



More than 100 credit cards available at uscards.com from uscards.com, you can pick more than 100 credit cards


Food & Health : Cooking & Packing Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


Healthy Recipes: Smoking Shrimp Creole
By Aicr.org
Nov 11, 2008 - 9:56:31 AM

E.mail t.his a.rticle
 P.rinter f.riendly p.age
Get n.ewsletter
 
   

A Taste of New Orleans

Shrimp and Rice
Don’t wait for Mardi Gras to enjoy some delicious New Orleans flavor. In about half an hour, you can create a spicy dish full of cancer-fighting compounds. This week’s dish features onions and garlic, two members of the allium family of vegetables, which researchers believe may offer protection from stomach cancer. In addition, cooked tomatoes maximize the health benefits from lycopene, a phytochemical found in the fruit that probably plays a role in reducing risk for prostate cancer. So whether it’s for taste or disease prevention, make this dish for your next get-together and spread the joy of healthful eating.

Smoking Shrimp Creole

1 tsp. canola oil
3/4 cup chopped onion
1 small green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
1 small celery rib, thinly sliced
2 tsp. finely chopped garlic
1 can (14 oz.) crushed tomatoes
2 bay leaves
1 tsp. ground paprika
1/8-1/4 tsp. ground chipotle chile
3/4 lb. small or medium shrimp, shelled
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 cups cooked long-grain brown rice

Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion, pepper, celery and garlic until the onion is translucent, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes, bay leaves, paprika and chipotle chile. Simmer the sauce, covered, until thick, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring it 2 or 3 times.

Add the shrimp and cook, uncovered, until they are pink and firm, 5 to 7 minutes, depending on their size. Be careful not to overcook or the shrimp will be tough and rubbery. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve over cooked brown rice.

Makes 4 servings.

Per serving: 260 calories, 4 g total fat (<1 g saturated fat), 36 g carbohydrate,
22 g protein, 5 g dietary fiber, 350 mg sodium.





© 2004-2008 by foodconsumer.org unless otherwise specified

Top of Page




Google
 
Web foodconsumer.org

Search Consumer-friendly Health Sites












We have moved to Food Consumer . Org



disclaimer | advertising | jobs | privacy | about us | newsletter | Submit news/articles
link partners: | Buy Viagra | MarketAmerica.com |
Buy a home | Auto Insurance | Mortgage refinancing | DaytonaCPA.com | Take Your Blog to a Higher Level
© Copyright 2004 - 2008 foodconsumer.org All rights reserved

Disclaimer: What's published on this website should be considered opinions of respective writers only and foodconsumer.org which has no political agenda nor commercial ambition may or may not endorse any opinion of any writer. No accuracy is guaranteed although writers are doing their best to provide accurate information only. The information on this website should not be construed as medical advice and should not be used to replace professional services provided by qualified or licensed health care workers. The site serves only as a platform for writers and readers to share knowledge, experience, and information from the scientific community, organizations, government agencies and individuals. Foodconsumer.org encourages readers who have had medical conditions to consult with licensed health care providers - conventional and or alternative medical practitioners.