Foodconsumer.org

 
USCards.com Bookmark Us
All Food, Diet and Health News 
 
 Misc. News
 Must-Read News
 Letter to Editor
 Featured Products
 Recalls & Alerts
 Consumer Affair
 Non-food Things
 Health Tips
 Interesting Sites
 
 Diet & Health
 Heart & Blood
 Cancer
 Body Weight
 Children & Women
 General Health
 Nutrition
 
 Food & Health
 Food Chemicals
 Biological Agents
 Cooking & Packing
 Technologies
 Agri. & Environ.
 Laws & Politics
 
 General Health
 Drug News
 Diseases
 Mental Health
 Infectious Disease
 Environment
 Lifestyle
 Government
 Other News
 
 Food Consumer
 FC News & Others
Search





Search Foodconsumer & Others


Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo
Newsfeed

foodconsumer.org news feed
Su bmit news[release]



More than 100 credit cards available at uscards.com from uscards.com, you can pick more than 100 credit cards


Misc. News : Consumer Affair Last Updated: Apr 20, 2011 - 9:38:09 AM


Analysis of fresh strawberries reveals consumer preferences
By news release
Feb 26, 2009 - 2:19:47 PM

E.mail t.his a.rticle
 P.rinter f.riendly p.age
Get n.ewsletter
 
   
Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Analysis of fresh strawberries reveals consumer preferences

Sensory, chemical analysis links harvest dates, sweetness to consumer favorites

IMAGE: "Florida Elyana, " one Florida strawberry cultivar preferred by consumers.

WINTER HAVEN, FL—Fresh strawberries. Just the mention of this iconic spring and early summer fruit can elicit mouthwatering memories of shortcake, fruity drinks and sweet desserts. Researchers interested in learning more about this evocative fruit have determined that "sensory quality" of strawberries, a strong influence on consumer preferences, is the result of a complex balance of sweetness, aroma, texture, and appearance.

The goals of a recent study by a research team from the University of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Wimauma, Florida and the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Winter Haven, were to reveal factors affecting the "eating quality" of promising strawberry selections in the University of Florida breeding program, as well as the impact of harvest date on the fruits' chemical and sensory characteristics.

According to lead author Anne Plotto of the USDA-ARS, the researchers evaluated five selections and one cultivar of the University of Florida breeding program as well as two new cultivars from Australia ('Rubygem' and 'Sugarbaby').

The sensory study took place at the University of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center during 2006 and 2007. Participants were employees from, and visitors to, the center. In 2006, 50 and 51 panelists participated in the February and March panels, respectively, with 62% to 63% female panelists. In 2007, 60 to 66 panelists (36% to 52% female panelists) participated in the taste panels. Panelist ages ranged from younger than 26 to older than 65 years old, with the majority of panelists between 36 and 55 years old.

The sensory evaluation showed that tasters determined a high variation among Florida strawberries in terms of flavor, sweetness, and tartness preferences. 'Festival', the main strawberry cultivar grown in Florida, had low ratings for flavor and sweetness in January and March. Selection 'FL 00-51' (now named 'Florida Elyana') and 'Rubygem' had relatively high and consistent ratings for flavor and sweetness compared with the other selections.

Plotto summarized the results, stating; "This study shows that aroma volatiles and sugar levels must be balanced to ensure a flavor appealing to consumers. Although germplasm strongly influenced volatile composition and perceived flavor, harvest date and season were also found to be an important factor influencing strawberry composition. Genotypes with low flavor ratings were most often judged as "not sweet enough" by the panelists, thus linking flavor to sweetness preference".

###

The complete study and abstract are available on the ASHS J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. electronic journal web site: http://journal.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/133/6/859

Founded in 1903, the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) is the largest organization dedicated to advancing all facets of horticultural research, education, and application. More information at ashs.org





© 2004-2008 by foodconsumer.org unless otherwise specified

Top of Page




Google
 
Web foodconsumer.org

Search Consumer-friendly Health Sites












We have moved to Food Consumer . Org



disclaimer | advertising | jobs | privacy | about us | newsletter | Submit news/articles
link partners: | Buy Viagra | MarketAmerica.com |
Buy a home | Auto Insurance | Mortgage refinancing | DaytonaCPA.com | Take Your Blog to a Higher Level
© Copyright 2004 - 2008 foodconsumer.org All rights reserved

Disclaimer: What's published on this website should be considered opinions of respective writers only and foodconsumer.org which has no political agenda nor commercial ambition may or may not endorse any opinion of any writer. No accuracy is guaranteed although writers are doing their best to provide accurate information only. The information on this website should not be construed as medical advice and should not be used to replace professional services provided by qualified or licensed health care workers. The site serves only as a platform for writers and readers to share knowledge, experience, and information from the scientific community, organizations, government agencies and individuals. Foodconsumer.org encourages readers who have had medical conditions to consult with licensed health care providers - conventional and or alternative medical practitioners.